Seagull

I dedicate my own production of the Seagull to this remarkable group, Krétakör from Budapest. I had the chance to see last year in New Jersey the best Seagull there is at this moment anywhere. In front of us there were not only excellent actors, but real human beings, intelligent, sensitive, who were not pretending to play, but were experiencing and feeling their parts. Unlike the way it usually happens in the theatre, where one pretends to feel and to experience. These actors did not „imagine” their roles, their intentions were sustained by an inner heat. It shows how untrue it is when the role is only in your head, when it is not experienced in every day life, it is nothing. These actors were present, next to us with no set, no costumes, no light effects, just words, relations, actions, truths. So clear and so near us that we could touch them. The director was Árpád Schilling. Seeing his production I got the courage to do again my own Seagull after having done it twice already.”                                                                            

Andrei Serban

Most of the acting would make Stanislavski weep with joy regarding its naturalistic detailing. This is one of the most quietly brilliant ensembles I have ever seen, with their tiniest gestures all painfully telling. The sensitivity to agonizing unhappiness in everyday lives is extraordinarily acute.”
Kate Bassett, Independent Online

Only once have I seen ( a Chekhov play) which brought out the comedy and the melancholy which everyone talks about, and that was a Russian production of The Cherry Orchard from the Maly Theatre in what was then Leningrad . I thought you just had to be Russian. Well, it seems you can be Hungarian too. It was a formidable victory over the claustrophobic costume drama which often passes for Chekhovian drama, as blue-jeaned broken-winged triumph.

Liz Kennedy, News Letter, Belfast

The idea that Chekhov's characters are us runs like a thread through a century of Chekhov criticism, but I doubt whether there has ever been a production that expresses that idea more powerfully than this display of raw dramatic skill and energy from the Kretakor Theatre of Budapest.
For more than three hours, Schilling's wonderful company offer us a compelling and unforgettable masterclass in how the essence of Chekhov's drama lies not in white lace dresses and samovars, nor in some hopeless nostalgia for pre-revolutionary Russia, but in the words and actions which reveal, in all their rawness, the fundamental human yearnings that drive the characters.

Joyce MacMillan, Scotsman

Most of the acting would make Stanislavski weep with joy regarding its naturalistic detailing. This is one of the most quietly brilliant ensembles I have ever seen, with their tiniest gestures all painfully telling. The sensitivity to agonising unhappiness in everyday lives is extraordinarily acute.

Kate Bassett, Independent